Jay and Leslie's Laughing Matters

Sum Of Our Favorite Numbers

MATH ASSEMBLY

Sum Of Our Favorite Numbers

Appropriate For: Grades K-6

Best For: Grades 1-4

Program Length: 45 minutes

Curriculum Objectives: Addition, Multiplication, Division, Remainders, Units of Measurement, Square and Triangular Numbers

In Sum Of Our Favorite Numbers we share reasons why we like various numbers—the way they look, the way they sound, and (most importantly) their mathematical quirks.

We explore the square number pattern by juggling bean bags and putting them in square arrays (2 x 2 =4; 3 x 3 = 9; etc.). Jay and two volunteers use stacking cups to examine the triangular number pattern (1 + 2 = 3; 1 + 2 + 3 = 6; etc.). We discover that 36 is in both number patterns.

Later in the assembly Leslie becomes increasingly frustrated trying to divide 13 rolls of toilet paper into equal sets of 2, 3, 4, or 6. The kids roll with laughter each time she has one left over. Who knew that division and remainders could be so much fun?

The Ruler Who Measured Too Much is laden with bad puns about units of measurement and their equivalents. Queen Cecily is under a spell that makes her constantly measure everything she sees. Sir Cumference helps her break the spell. After the story, students identify the units of measurement that were used in the wordplay.


Common Core Standards:

2nd Grade
Work with equal groups of objects to gain foundations for multiplication.
CCSS.Math.Content.2.OA.C.4
Use addition to find the total number of objects arranged in rectangular arrays with up to 5 rows and up to 5 columns; write an equation to express the total as a sum of equal addends.

3rd Grade
Represent and solve problems involving multiplication and division.
CCSS.Math.Content.3.OA.A.1
Interpret products of whole numbers, e.g., interpret 5 × 7 as the total number of objects in 5 groups of 7 objects each. For example, describe a context in which a total number of objects can be expressed as 5 × 7.

Represent and solve problems involving multiplication and division.
CCSS.Math.Content.3.OA.A.2
Interpret whole-number quotients of whole numbers, e.g., interpret 56 ÷ 8 as the number of objects in each share when 56 objects are partitioned equally into 8 shares, or as a number of shares when 56 objects are partitioned into equal shares of 8 objects each. For example, describe a context in which a number of shares or a number of groups can be expressed as 56 ÷ 8.

4th Grade
Use the four operations with whole numbers to solve problems.
CCSS.Math.Content.4.OA.A.1
Interpret a multiplication equation as a comparison, e.g., interpret 35 = 5 × 7 as a statement that 35 is 5 times as many as 7 and 7 times as many as 5. Represent verbal statements of multiplicative comparisons as multiplication equations.

Generate and analyze patterns.
CCSS.Math.Content.4.OA.C.5
Generate a number or shape pattern that follows a given rule. Identify apparent features of the pattern that were not explicit in the rule itself.

Use place value understanding and properties of operations to perform multi-digit arithmetic.
CCSS.Math.Content.4.NBT.B.5
Multiply a whole number of up to four digits by a one-digit whole number, and multiply two two-digit numbers, using strategies based on place value and the properties of operations. Illustrate and explain the calculation by using equations, rectangular arrays, and/or area models.

Use place value understanding and properties of operations to perform multi-digit arithmetic.
CCSS.Math.Content.4.NBT.B.6
Find whole-number quotients and remainders with up to four-digit dividends and one-digit divisors, using strategies based on place value, the properties of operations, and/or the relationship between multiplication and division. Illustrate and explain the calculation by using equations, rectangular arrays, and/or area models.